Installation

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Installing LibreELEC

1 USB-SD Creator tool

While you can still use the instructions on this page, LibreELEC now has a tool for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux that will do all the work for you to create a LibreELEC installation on a USB drive or SD card. See the LibreELEC USB-SD Creator page for details.

2 Requirements

You need only a few things to install LibreELEC onto your HTPC device.

  • A personal computer to do the creation of the installer/installation on. This can be a Windows, Linux, or Mac OSX based computer.
  • A blank USB stick or SD card.
- If you plan to install LibreELEC onto an Intel x86-64 device, 512MB-1GB for the installer stick is already sufficient.
- For other htpc devices (Raspberry, Wetek, Cubox, Odroid, etcetera, a minimum of 4GB or larger for the target SD card is preferred.

3 Installing

Now select the operating system you are going to use to write the LibreELEC disk image with.

3.1 Installing using Windows

Requirements
  • Windows XP / 7 / 8 / 10
  • The Rufus writing application.
  • The suitable diskimage for your HTPC device.
Instructions
  • Insert your USB Stick / SDcard into your system. It should appear with a new drive letter.
  • Directly load the .img.gz diskimage into Rufus, and write the diskimage onto the USB stick / SD card.


Alternatively:

  • Extract the image from the .gz file using 7zip.
  • Insert your USB Stick / SDcard into your system. It should appear with a new drive letter.
  • Run Win32DiskImager
  • Select the image file and verify the destination drive letter is correct, then click write.

When it is finished, use Safe Remove in Windows before removing the USB stick or SDcard.


3.2 Installing using Linux

Extracting the archive using the GUI

The installation file comes in a compressed format, which needs to be unzipped. Double-clicking the .img.gz file should open your Archive Manager tool in your Linux environment. Extract the .img file from the .gz file, and move it to a location of your choice.

In Terminal modus

Change to the folder where you downloaded and extracted the image to (assuming the Downloads folder in your home directory):

cd ~/Downloads

Extract the image from the compressed download file:

gunzip -d LibreELEC-Generic-x86_64-7.0.0.img.gz  (as an example filename)
Creating the USB Stick

Plug in your target USB Stick. Type sudo blkid to find out which /dev/sdX it is.

You can also use parted or fdisk

parted -l

Make sure the disk is unmounted

 umount /dev/sdX

You need superuser privileges for writing the diskimage, so either use the root user or sudo. Writing the diskimage is done via the following command:

sudo dd if=LibreELEC-Generic.x86_64-7.0.0.img of=/dev/sdX bs=4M

Ensure the changes are synced to the USB Stick before removing it:

sync


3.3 Installing using Mac OSX

Extracting the archive using the GUI

Simple double click the LibreELEC-build-architecture-version.img.gz file in the finder to let archive utility extract it for you.


Extracting the archive using the CLI (Command Line Interface)

Open the Terminal.

Change to the folder where you downloaded the release archive to (lets assume the Downloads folder in your home directory):

cd ~/Downloads

Then extract the archive. It will be named LibreELEC-build-architecture-version.img.gz. We need to use gunzip to extract the archive.

gunzip -d LibreELEC-Generic.x86_64-7.0.0.img.gz


Creating the USB Stick / SD card

Insert your USB stick and open a terminal window and run the following

diskutil list | grep -v disk0 | tail +2

This will output something like this

/dev/disk1
   #:                       TYPE NAME                    SIZE       IDENTIFIER
   0:     FDisk_partition_scheme                        *8.0 GB     disk1
   1:                 DOS_FAT_32 UNTITLED                8.0 GB     disk1s1

Find your USB Stick, in this case it is disk1

You need to use diskutil to unmount the disk, replace "x" with your disk number found using the step before.

diskutil unmountDisk /dev/diskx

Next we need to zero out the partition map, OSX has an issue if you don't do this

sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdiskx bs=1024 count=1

Next we need to write the disk image. You'll need superuser privileges to do this, whether you use the root user or sudo. Either way, you need to execute the following command:

sudo dd if=LibreELEC-Generic.x86_64-7.0.0.img of=/dev/rdiskx bs=4m

Ensure the changes are synced to the USB Stick before removing it:

sync

Safely remove your USB key.

3.4 Installing to NAND/eMMC

Wetek-logo.png

For devices such as the Wetek Core / OpenELEC / Play (1/2) / HUB, there is the option to install LibreELEC not just on an SD card, but on the devices' internal memory card instead.

When the Wetek device's Android OS has been fully upgraded, go to the LibreELEC website and select the correct LibreELEC build for your Wetek device, and download the .zip file.

Now place the contents of that zip file onto an empty microSD card (FAT formatted). You can use your own favourite Zip-tool for that (7zip, WinRAR, etcetera). Linux users can do this directly from the command-line in a Terminal session:

Command-line example :

 unzip -d /dev/sdX LibreELEC-WeTek_Play.arm-7.0.2.zip  (where /dev/sdX is the device name of your SD card reader/writer)

Put the microSD card in the Wetek device, and hold the power button right after plugging in the power cable. You should get the screen text for booting from NAND, which must be entered via the remote's power button.

After that, the installation will start. Follow on-screen directions to finish the installation. And finally, don't forget to remove the microSD card from its slot.

You may have to use the power button on the remote again, once, to change the default boot option to NAND booting on your Wetek device when you restart it.

4 Updating

See: HOW TO:Update LibreELEC

5 See also